Search Library

The Canadian Observatory on Homelessness acknowledges with thanks the financial support of The Home Depot Canada Foundation. Thanks to the staff, partners and service users (past and present) of Choices for Youth and Train for Trades who assisted in...
As with most projects of the Canadian Observatory on Homelessness/Homeless Hub the toolkit was developed through a very collaborative process. A brief review of literature related to youth employment and social enterprise initiatives was conducted (...
Thanks to the staff and service users (past and present) of Choices for Youth and the Train for Trades program in St. John’s, Newfoundland who assisted in the development of the toolkit through taking part in interviews, providing data and resources...
Another way of measuring success is to look at impact in sharing the story of the work being done. Train for Trades has been recognized as a successful program/best practice numerous times including:  2014 – Train for Trades was featured as a...
The Canadian Observatory on Homelessness (COH) acknowledges with thanks the financial support of the Government of Canada’s Homelessness Partnering Strategy (Employment and Social Development Canada) and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research...
Tim Aubry, Meaghan Bell, John Ecker, Paula Goering
The Homelessness Partnering Secretariat (HPS) has developed several directives to assist communities with the shift to a Housing First framework. The first directive states that chronically and episodically homeless individuals should be prioritized...
Communities that are participating in the HPS Coordinated Count can add questions to the HPS 10 Core Survey questions. The Canadian Observatory on Homelessness – in partnership with the National Homeless Count Research Advisory Team – has created a...
For the past two years, the Canadian Observatory on Homelessness, in partnership with the Canadian Alliance to End Homelessness, has prepared an analysis of the homelessness landscape in this country. Each report looked at the number of people...
All research with Aboriginal Peoples, including PiT Counts, should be conducted with an understanding of the potential harm that can result from externally-driven research. Historically, research conducted by European settlers has harmed many...
This resource supports Canadian communities to develop cultural competency and foster partnerships between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities during the Homelessness Partnering Strategy’s Coordinated Point-Time Count.  Due to the significant...
The success of your PiT Count will rely on your ability to locate the individuals that are experiencing homelessness in your community. With youth, this task can be especially difficult. Youth, particularly those involved with child protection or...
A PiT Count serves two functions: first, to measure the extent of homelessness. Second, to gather valuable data on those experiencing it. The PiT Count survey provides a unique opportunity to gather data on the demographics and service needs of...
In Canada, Youth Counts are relatively new. The Youth Count Toolkit is a summation of what we know to-date. As communities build their capacity to enumerate youth homelessness, develop new and improved Youth Count strategies and share learning with...
In traditional PiT Counts, individuals who indicate they are staying temporarily with friends are often screened out of the PiT Count process. That is, they are not “counted” in the total number of individuals experiencing homelessness. This is for...
A PiT Count Survey provides important and necessary data to give context for the count. While it is important to know the number of people experiencing homelessness in community, it is equally important to understand the circumstances of those...